Dog Breeds Beginning With A


From the affable Affenpinscher to the exotic Azawakh, their are some fantastic breeds of dog beginning with the letter A. From small breeds to large, from fluffy to coarse, one of these may be your ideal dog.

The dogs listed below are breeds that have been recognized by the American Kennel Club.

Affenpinscher   

Affenpinscher   

The Affenpinscher is a part of the toy group. Measuring less than 12 inches long, and a weight up to 10 pounds, the Affenpinscher is a lovely small dog.

This breed is also known as the monkey terrier due to the name Affe meaning monkey in German. The Affenpinscher is a very loyal dog and fearless for its size.   

Afghan Hound   

Afghan Hound

If ever a dog was meant to look like a supermodel, then the Afghan hound is that dog. Measuring up to 27 inches and weighing in excess of 50 pounds, the Afghan hound is a large hound.

They have a silky coat, which is thick, but fine. A beautiful, loyal, but sometimes silly dog. 

Airedale Terrier  

Airedale Terrier

“The King of Terriers” is their nickname and for a good reason. Originating from England, the Airedale is the largest of the terrier breeds. They were originally bred from other terriers as a hunting and working farm dog.

They have also been used as police dogs, guide dogs, and also to hunt big game and fowl. At 23 inches long, and up to 70 pounds in weight, the Airedale is not the largest breed but has a big personality.    

Akita  

Akita

The Akita originates from mountainous regions in Japan. This breed is a powerful, muscular dog, known for their courage and loyalty. Growing in height up to 28 inches, the males can weigh up to 130 pounds.

They have a double-coat similar to the German Shepherd and are a dominant breed, affectionate with family members but wary of strangers.     

Alaskan Malamute  

Alaskan Malamute

The Alaskan Malamute is a very strong dog, originally bred to haul freight, and later used to pull sleds in freezing Alaskan conditions.

Built for power, but not for speed, the Alaskan Malamute can weigh up to 85 pounds and reach a height of 25 inches. They need a strong owner to stop them from chasing after small animals.     

American English Coonhound

American English Coonhound

Descended from Foxhounds, the American English Coonhound was bred to pursue raccoons. Only recognized in 2011 as a full member of the hound group by the AKC, they can weigh up to 65 pounds with a height of 26 inches.

A breed that needs regular exercise, the Coonhound does make a good pet, with the right training.

American Eskimo Dog   

American Eskimo Dog

The American Eskimo Dog comes in three different size varieties; the toy, miniature, and the standard variety.

The toy stands 12 inches high and weighs up to 10 pounds. The miniature stands up to 15 inches high and weighs up to 20 pounds, and the standard is 19 inches high and weighs up to 35 pounds.

They make an excellent guard dog and were originally bred for this purpose. They are very vocal dogs.    

American Foxhound   

American Foxhound

A cousin of the English Foxhound, the American Foxhound is a scent hound, bred to hunt foxes. They are very good-natured with other dogs, cats, and children, and love their owners.

The American Foxhound has a distinctive bark, called a bay, which is almost musical. They are one of the rarest breeds in the American Kennel Club. They stand up to 25 inches in height and can weigh up to 70 pounds.    

American Hairless Terrier

American Hairless Terrier

Although the name makes it sound like they are hairless, they come in two varieties; hairless and non-hairless. One of the newest members of the AKC, the American Hairless Terrier, was recognized fully in 2016.

Perfect for allergy sufferers, the hairless version literally has no hair. A small dog weighing up to 16 pounds, with a height of 16 inches, they make a fantastic addition to any family.

American Leopard Hound

American Leopard Hound

Part of the AKC Foundation Stock Service since 2012, the American Leopard Hound, comes with a leopard or spotted hair pattern. They come in many colors, including blue, red, black, or brindle, making up two-thirds of their coat; the other third being white.

One of the cleverest breeds on the planet; they are extremely protective of children. They weigh up to 70 pounds with a height of up to 27 inches.

American Staffordshire Terrier  

American Staffordshire Terrier

Also known as the Amstaff, the American Staffordshire Terrier is very loyal and trustworthy. Recognized since 1936 by the AKC, the Amstaff loves being part of a family.

Very muscular and stocky, they have a height of 19 inches and weigh up to 70 pounds. The Amstaff is a descendant of the American Pit Bull Terrier.    

American Water Spaniel  

American Water Spaniel

The American Water Spaniel was originally bred as a hunting dog that could be transported in small riverboats, and that could withstand the icy river temperatures.

They have a waterproof coat with webbed toes and thickly padded feet. They are 18 inches high and weigh up to 45 pounds.  

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

One of the quickest breeds on this list, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog was bred to protect livestock. Originally from Turkey, they originate from some of the oldest domestic-canine animals.

They shed their coats excessively and need to be brushed once or twice a week. They stand in height up to 29 inches, and weigh up to 150 pounds, although due to their thick coat, they look a lot heavier.

Appenzeller Sennenhund

Appenzeller Sennenhund

Also known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog or Appenzell Cattle Dog, the Sennenhund is a fearless guard dog. Originally bred to be a cattle-herding dog, the Appenzeller is a great farm dog.

They are not good for apartment-living and need a lot of exercise. The Appenzeller Sennenhund stands up to 22 inches tall and weighs up to 70 pounds.

Australian Cattle Dog  

Australian Cattle Dog  

The Australian Cattle Dog is another breed suited to cattle-herding. Related to the wild dingo, this breed of cattle dog is muscular and sturdy, with great strength.

At 20 inches high, they can weigh up to 50 pounds. They have a white coat with black or red hairs interspersed, and generally, have a mask which covers one or both eyes.  

Australian Kelpie

Australian Kelpie

Another breed that is part of the Foundation Stock Service, the Australian Kelpie has a great deal of energy. They are a great sheepdog, having descended from Collie dogs.

There are two varieties of Kelpie: The Show Kelpie and the Working Kelpie. The name Kelpie comes from a shape-shifting water spirit of mythological Celtic folklore. They can grow up to 20 inches in height and a weight of 44 pounds.    

Australian Shepherd    

Australian Cattle Dog

A very smart dog, the Australian Shepherd is also known as the “Aussie.” With a height of 23 inches and a weigh up to 65 pounds, these dogs have a beautiful, long, tri-colored, bi-colored, blue merle or red merle coat.

These dogs are not suitable for home life, due to their high work drive, and are bred as a working dog.  

Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog

Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog

Another working Australian dog, the Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog, is big on personality. Another member of the AKC Foundation Stock Service stands 20 inches in height and weigh up to 45 pounds.

They were bred from Smithfield, herding dogs, and cross-bred with the wild dingo. Their most distinctive feature is where they get their name, a short 4-inch tail. 

Australian Terrier

Australian Terrier

Part of the Terrier group, the Australian Terrier is a small breed at 11 inches high and weighing up to 20 pounds. They have a medium-length coat, with a distinctive ruff around the neck.

They are very quick to learn and be trained and are fantastic watchdogs. If you have other dogs in the household, the Australian Terrier may not be for you.

Azawakh

Azawakh

From West Africa, the Azawakh is from Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger, in the Azawakh Valley. Part of the Hound Group, they grow up to 29 inches tall and weigh up to 55 pounds.

They have a short coat, with colors of sand to dark brown, brindle and red. They can also have a dark mask on their face, and white tips to their feet, tail tip and big.

Bryan Harding

Bryan has spent his whole life around animals. While loving all animals, Bryan is especially fond of mammals and has studied and worked with them around the world. Not only does Bryan share his knowledge and experience with our readers, but he also serves as owner, editor, and publisher of North American Mammals.

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